Friday, March 30, 2012

Old Salem at Dusk, Part 2

Hi folks!  I don't mean to bore you all to death with my posts on Old Salem, but I wanted to share the rest of the pics that Mr. Forest Manor took earlier this week.  Overall, I was pleased with my pictures, but he took some really awesome photos that I just have to share.

The community of Old Salem is such an integral part of our town.  It is where we began; and even though progress continues all around it, Old Salem remains like a small bit of history -- preserved and restored.  All the power lines are buried underground, so except for the cars you see there, you do get a feeling of having stepped back 200 years in time.

I took a photo of this stone wall, which is in my previous post.  My husband took this picture at the end of the wall, showing the intersection of a brick sidewalk and path.  I like the two different patterns of brickwork here.

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Old Salem at Dusk

Hi everyone!  Are you enjoying these pretty spring days?  It sounds like some folks are getting late snows in their part of the country -- I hope it melts quickly for you.

I want to share some images of Old Salem with you.  I wrote about this historic area of our town last summer, which you can read about HERE and HERE.  Yesterday, hubby and I took some pictures there as twilight was falling.  We hadn't exactly planned it that way, but by the time we ate dinner and got to Old Salem, it was almost dusk.

This time around, we mainly took pictures of the church and the college.  The first photos are of  Home Moravian Church.  The church was built in 1799 and dedicated in 1800.

 

Sunday, March 25, 2012

Fences for Mosaic Monday

Hi all!  I hope everyone had a nice weekend.  We had lots of rain and some seriously loud thunderstorms.  It's still raining, as I write this at 8:45 p.m., but the weather is supposed to clear and be pretty tomorrow.

Last week I selected four photos which I've used in previous blog posts in order to participate in Vee's Note Card Party at A Haven For Vee.  The photos are of interesting fences that I felt would make pretty note cards.  After I did the post, I thought how neat they would look in a mosaic.  So I found a few more fence pictures from my blog posts to add to the group and made a mosaic for Mosaic Monday, hosted by Mary at Little Red House.  Thank you, Mary, for hosting this blog party.




I appreciate your visits and I hope you have a great Monday!


Denise

Friday, March 23, 2012

An Ode to the Redbud

Our Redbud Trees in North Carolina are in full bloom right now.  It seems as if, overnight, they just burst into glorious color.  Many people have them planted in their yards, but they also grow wild in the woods (along with the Dogwood Trees).  And this time of year, you can see the Redbuds blooming all along the highways and interstates of our region, announcing that spring is here.

I've always thought that Redbud is entirely the wrong name for these trees, for their blooms aren't red, but a wonderful, purplish-pink color.  For as long as I can remember, they have been one of my favorite trees.  They are typically quite hardy, and when they get larger, they provide a wonderful shade in summer with a canopy of heart-shaped leaves.

Redbuds are also known as Judas Trees, although I don't hear them called that very often.  According to the website About.com.Forestry, our native North American redbud is the Cercis canadensis, and "the specific redbud that is most often labeled Judas Tree is Cercis siliquastrum, and lives in Mediterranean and Asia Minor countries.  That tree is the one most associated as "Judea's Tree" and is supposedly the tree Judas Iscariot hanged himself on after betraying Christ."

My North Carolina gardening book states that Redbuds are short-lived trees.  But in this case, I would beg to differ.  This old, and rather gnarled Redbud Tree in our front yard has been here since we moved in 16 years ago, and it was a mature tree at that time.  Since our house is 40 years old, I would bet the tree is at least that old.  In addition, it survived damage from a serious tornado that hit ours and surrounding neighborhoods in 1999.  You can see in the pictures where some of the big limbs were broken, and its shape is not the prettiest.  Yet there is something dignified in the way this tree continues to stand as sentinel at the top of our driveway.  It blooms every year like clockwork, and I'm quite attached to it after all these years.

Here are some pictures I took yesterday afternoon when the sky was partly overcast.

     



You can see the stunted shape of some of the limbs in the picture below.


The front of our house gets the bright morning sun, and since it wasn't foggy this morning, I zipped outside with my camera to try and get some more pictures of the tree.  I then noticed that my next-door neighbor's younger and smaller Redbud was blooming, and the sun was shining directly on it.



I just love those tiny pink blooms against the backdrop of a blue, blue sky.



Now for some close-ups...









Do you have Redbud Trees in your part of the world?  If so, are they blooming now?

Thanks so much for visiting my blog and taking time to leave a comment.  I always enjoy reading them.  :)  I hope you have a great weekend -- ours is predicted to be rainy.



Denise

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Note Card Party

I'm joining the other folks at Vee's blog, A Haven for Vee, to participate in her note card party.  Just select four photos that you've already used in one of your existing blog posts.  I'm using a theme of "fences" for my note cards, with a caption for each photo.  I am fascinated by pretty fences.  Whether they're elegant wrought iron, rustic wood, or white picket fences, I can't resist photographing them.  I think I'd enjoy seeing these on note cards.  :)

 Episcopal Church -- Highlands, North Carolina


 Rustic Garden Fence -- Old Salem, North Carolina


Ireland, 1999


 Wrought-Iron Hearts -- Wilmington, North Carolina

As always, I appreciate your visits, and I hope you enjoyed the pictures.  Which fence do you like best?


Denise

Sunday, March 18, 2012

Beginning a Kitchen Remodel

Hi everyone!  I hope all of you had a great weekend and hopefully enjoyed celebrating a bit o' the Irish.  I have a partial metamorphosis to share with you today.  We're having our kitchen remodeled; that's right, we're dragging it bringing it into the 21st century.  This is so exciting for me because I've waited 16 years to do this.

Our house was built in 1972, and we're the third owners.  The first owners had it custom built and lived here 22 years.  The second owners lived here two years before they relocated to Atlanta.  And as of this summer, we will have lived here for 16 years.

Thankfully, the second owners did some re-modeling and updating to the house while they were here.  When we viewed the house, they told us that most of the house still had its original 1970's decor when they moved in.  The kitchen had orange Formica counter tops, yellow, tile backsplash, and avocado green appliances.  A Brady Bunch kitchen for sure.

The young couple who sold us the house updated most of the kitchen as soon as they purchased the house.  They took down the original wallpaper and replaced it with a pattern that I really liked for many years.  They replaced the orange counter top with white Formica, which has remained in pretty good condition.  They replaced the yellow backsplash.  They also replaced all the appliances with shiny, new white ones, and a white porcelain sink.  What they didn't replace was the linoleum floor and the cabinets (the most expensive part of the re-model).

Have a look at our 40 year old cabinets.  I'm trying not to cringe when I see them in photos.


They look pretty sad, huh?  I will so not miss that hardware.  These cabinets were carpenter built on site; the doors are real driftwood, so the texture is not smooth, but filled with little holes.  They're heavy doors and no longer hang quite straight after all these years.  In addition, my husband and I have both picked up some nasty splinters from the rough texture of the wood.  Aesthetically, they're just very dark and dismal looking.  Below you can see how badly scratched all the drawers are around the handles.  Ugh.

  
Now the good thing about these cabinets is that they are spacious and hold a lot of stuff.  But although they're spacious, they're not terribly efficient.  They don't have any of those nifty features that all the new custom cabinets have; no self-closing drawers, pull-out shelves, or corner cabinets with built-in lazy susan.  They have those blind corner areas, where you can store things, but you have to be a Chinese acrobat to be able to get to said stored items.  And folks, I'm just not as limber as I used to be.

At the first meeting with our contractor, we realized that tearing out the existing cabinets (which are nailed to the wall and floor) and replacing them with new custom cabinets, was going to break our whole budget.  We weren't too surprised because we had been pricing them for a while.  So we chose to keep the existing framework and get all new doors and drawers.  They will then be painted a stoneware color (kind of an off-white or creamy white), and we're going with antique bronze hardware.

Our pantry was built as part of the cabinet units.  That wouldn't be such a bad thing except it was actually designed to be used as a broom closet.  It's plenty deep and tall, but it has no shelves.  Storing our food and paper products has really been a pain.  In the case of our kitchen drawers, we only have five, and they're all the exact same, shallow depth.   It's next to impossible to get all my dish towels and dish cloths, measuring cups and spoons, and assorted utensils like ladles, spatulas, large spoons, etc., in those shallow drawers.

To address our storage problem, our cabinet person is building an insert to fit into our existing pantry.  It will have one stationary shelf in the center, and then lots of adjustable shelves for storing our canned foods, sauce bottles, cooking oil, boxed foods, etc.  The lower cabinet to the left of the stove will be converted to a drawer stack, with some deeper drawers for my kitchen linens and utensils.  I can't wait (squeal)!! 


As for the rest of the kitchen, the wallpaper was removed last weekend, and our contractor, Tim, has prepped the walls, chair rail molding, and door frames for painting.  Here's a before of the walls (this is our eating area).


When we bought this house, the sellers told us the name of the wallpaper pattern was "French Country."  I liked the pattern and border paper, but have grown tired of them by now.  I think this wallpaper makes for too much "busyness" in the kitchen.

The green shelf above will not be put back on the wall, but my shiny copper pieces will.


The walls will be painted a very soft yellow and all the trim will be glossy white.  I can't wait to get rid of all the stained woodwork.  The door will be painted, as well.


Here's how things looked as of this evening.  The walls are now prepped and partially primed for the new paint.  Please excuse all the stuff piled on the table.  The stained door you see to the right of the microwave cart will be replaced with a newly painted six-panel door.


Do you think I have enough refrigerator magnets? ;)  We don't always realize how things look to other people until we see them in a picture.  Believe me, not all the "do-dads" in the existing kitchen will be part of the new kitchen.


You can see our pantry/broom closet to the right of the door in the photo below.


When Tim removed the original crown molding this weekend, he found these strips of the original 1970's wallpaper.  Don't you love it? :)  I can't wait to show my mom and mother-in-law.



Our cabinet guy is building a stationary cabinet to replace the microwave cart in this corner.


Tim will remove the chair rail molding in that spot to make room for the new cabinet, and it will have a granite top to match the rest of the counter tops.

This island table we found at an antique store several years ago.  It will be painted a glossy black (unless we decide on another color) to provide a  contrast for the other cabinets.




We replaced the original linoleum floor several years ago with a better quality linoleum, and it will remain for now.  It's still in good shape, and it's not in our budget this year to replace it.  The refrigerator and dishwasher will remain, but we're replacing the sink and we're replacing the stove with a free-standing range.  We're staying with white appliances because I just like white appliances.

This checkerboard backsplash will be replaced, too


At the moment, this isn't a very pretty metamorphosis, buy I wanted to show a few of the stages on the way to the finished project.  It will be several more weeks before it's completed.  But I just know we're going to love it.

My vision for our new kitchen is an English cottage or English country kitchen, with American touches too, of course.   I'll leave you with a few images of English country kitchens that I thought were just charming.  Wouldn't it be neat to have one of these Aga cookers in your kitchen?  Definitely not in the budget.

source







What's your favorite style of kitchen?  Do you need an update like me, or do you already have a kitchen you love?

Thanks for stopping by today.  I always appreciate your visits and your comments.  I do make an effort to reply to your comments and look forward to visiting your blogs.  Have a great day.

I'm joining Metamorphosis Monday, hosted by Susan at Between Naps on the Porch.

Denise 

Friday, March 16, 2012

Happy Pink Saturday and Happy St. Patrick's Day

Hi everyone!  What gorgeous weather we've had this week!!  Just in time for Pink Saturday...


My husband took these pictures of our Saucer Magnolia, or Tulip Magnolia, about two weeks ago.  We had a freeze three nights later, and yesterday we had a thunderstorm, so the blooms are mostly on the ground at this point.  It was pretty while it lasted. :)

Does anyone have plans for celebrating St. Paddy's Day tomorrow?  Some of the Irish restaurants in our area are having all-day buffets, starting around 10:30 a.m., and Irish bands performing all day, as well.  Lots of festivities.  Hope you enjoy the day wherever you may be!


If you'd like to see more pictures from our trip to Ireland, you can click on the posts HERE and HERE.  Thanks for visiting me, and I'm joining Pink Saturday, hosted by Beverly at How Sweet the Sound, Seasonal Sundays, hosted by The Tablescaper, and Mosaic Monday, hosted by Mary at Little Red House.

All the best!

Denise 

Thursday, March 15, 2012

The Land of Shamrocks, Part 2

St. Paddy's Day hasn't arrived yet, but everyone is still celebrating.  There's a whole lot of celebrating going on over at Cuisine Kathleen's place.  She's hosting the Fourth Annual St. Patrick's Day Blog Party Crawl (try saying that three times really fast) :)

I thought I would leave you with a few last images of Ireland from the trip we took in 1999 (you can see Part 1 of our trip HERE).  But I also wanted to share some thoughts about my experience.  I so appreciate all the nice comments people left on the first part of my post.  It's amazing how many out there have Irish roots and have traveled to Ireland.  A few of you mentioned "The Troubles" in your comments.  When we think of Ireland, we think of the beauty -- the unbelievable green land, the magical light, the flowers, cottages, and the hospitable people.  And unfortunately, most of us think of "The Troubles."


Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Ireland, The Land of Shamrocks

This week it seems that in America and across the big pond; in the old country and the new, almost everyone is celebrating being Irish.  Some folks can claim a true Irish heritage, and others are Irish only in spirit.  But either way, we all seem to enjoy the experience of St. Patrick's Day.

In April of 1999, I was fortunate enough to be able to travel to England and Ireland with my husband, who was spending a lot of time there on a big computer project for work.  The company he works for has a facility in England and one in Northern Ireland.  Now I realize that Northern Ireland is not really Ireland proper, as it's actually part of Great Britain.  But, if you have a rental car, the Republic of Ireland is within driving distance and one can spend the day there, which is what we did.

It really was a great adventure, this trip.  I'm so thankful I had the chance to go.  It was mostly a working trip for my husband, but at least he was able to be free on the weekends, and that's when we did most of our sightseeing.

Our trip was scheduled for ten days, and two of those were spent in the air between London and Raleigh, North Carolina.  One day was spent traveling to Belfast, Northern Ireland.  So that left us with five days in England and two full days in Ireland.

I don't have a lot of pictures of Ireland, but I'll share what I have.  We didn't own a digital camera in 1999, and these pictures were made on my beloved Canon Sureshot, 35mm, automatic focus.  My parents gave it to Mr. Forest Manor and I for our first Christmas.  It was so easy to use, and it actually took pretty good pictures.

I spent about two hours today scanning all these pictures into Picasa and editing some of them.  To be almost 13 years old, they've held up pretty well.


These pictures were taken in and around the town of Newcastle, County Down, Northern Ireland.  Newcastle is a seaside resort at the base of the Mountains of Mourne.  I like the colorful red and yellow trim on the doors and windows above.






We stayed at the Slieve Donard Hotel in Newcastle.  The hotel takes its name from Slieve Donard, the highest peak in the Mourne Mountains.




The big room that looks like a conservatory is where they served breakfast in the morning.  It had a great view of the surrounding area.

Breakfast consisted of eggs and Irish bacon (which is more like our ham).  What we would call bacon in the States, they call "streaky meat."  They also served sausages, toast with butter and marmalade, delicious yogurt with fruit, and tea and coffee.  Oh, I almost forgot to mention the traditional grilled tomato that is usually served with full breakfast in the U.K.

But the oddest thing they served was beans for breakfast; they looked just like what we call pork 'n beans that you buy in a can.  I don't know how they tasted because I didn't eat any. :)  I made a point to try most things while I was over there, but I just don't do beans for breakfast.  The other thing I could not bring myself to eat was the black pudding.  If you're not familiar with this dish, it is also known as blood pudding or blood sausage.  It's a blend of onions, pork fat, oatmeal, flavorings, and blood (usually from a pig).  Ugh. 


These next pictures are outside the hotel, looking out towards the Mountains of Mourne and the water...more breathtaking views.



Yes, this is Yours Truly, in a little garden area outside the hotel.


Some of the photo is slightly faded out, or over-exposed, I'm not sure which.  The funny thing is, I wore that green coat almost everywhere in England and Ireland.  It seems to pop up frequently in our pictures. ;)


This picture was at the back of the hotel.  The walkway led down to a wrought-iron gate, which opened onto the beach.


The beach, with tennis courts to the left.


A closer glimpse of the pretty, wrought-iron gate.


Here are the Mourne Mountains, running right down to the sea.  They were often misty like this in the morning.  Makes me think of the Misty Mountains in Tolkien's Middle-Earth Trilogies.



Even though these pictures are old, you may be able to tell that the quality of light in Ireland is beautiful and has so many variations.


That's enough pictures, I think, for one post.  I have just a very few pictures of Dublin I'll show in another post.  My post doesn't have a recipe or pretty table; due to a re-model, our kitchen and dining room are in chaos at the moment.  I hope it's okay for me to join Cuisine Kathleen's St. Patrick's Day Blog Party Crawl, beginning tomorrow, March 13th.  There will be lots of food, pretty tables, and at least 40 shades of green.  Hope you'll be there!  Thanks so very much for hosting this fun party, Kathleen!!

Thank you for visiting the House at Forest Manor.  I always appreciate your visits and kind comments.  What do you plan on doing to celebrate the Irish this week?

Denise
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